The Australian Guide to Healthy Eating

The Australian Guide to Healthy Eating free pdf ebook was written by Australian Department Of Health And Aged Care on May 01, 2008 consist of 27 page(s). The pdf file is provided by www.health.gov.au and available on pdfpedia since September 08, 2011.

prepared by the children's health development foundation, south. australia, and deakin t h e a u s t r a l i a n g u i d e t o h e a l t h y e a t i n g ...

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The Australian Guide to Healthy Eating pdf




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: September 08, 2011
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: Australian Department Of Health And Aged Care
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The Australian Guide to Healthy Eating - page 1
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The Australian Guide to Healthy Eating - page 2
FUNDED BY THE AUSTRALIAN GOVERNMENT DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND AGEING. PREPARED BY THE CHILDREN’S HEALTH DEVELOPMENT FOUNDATION, SOUTH Australian Government AUSTRALIA, AND DEAKIN UNIVERSITY, VICTORIA, 1998.
The Australian Guide to Healthy Eating - page 3
The Australian Guide to Healthy Eating - page 4
C ONTENTS Page Introduction The Australian Guide to Healthy Eating Enjoy a variety of foods everyday Bread, cereals, rice, pasta, noodles Vegetables, legumes Fruit Milk, yoghurt, cheese Meat, fish, poultry, eggs, nuts, legumes Extra foods Water Putting it all together - Shopping, cooking, and eating meals, snacks and drinks - your healthy diet For more information 1 2 4 5 6 8 10 12 14 16 17 19 22 T H E A U S T R A L I A N G U I D E T O H E A LT H Y E A T I N G
The Australian Guide to Healthy Eating - page 5
I NTRODUCTION The Australian Guide to Healthy Eating has been developed for the Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing to help Australians choose a healthy diet using a variety of foods. The advice in this booklet applies to most people, except very young children and people with special needs (see page 22). Food is not just a source of nutrients. It is important for good social and emotional health as well as physical health. Food and eating are part of the way people live their lives. The eating patterns of individuals and families are constantly being shaped and changed by a variety of factors. Some of these include: the kinds of food that are available at the local supermarket or shop cultural and family background the amount of time available to shop for, prepare and cook food the personal likes and dislikes of household members values, attitudes and beliefs about food and eating knowledge about food and nutrition advertising campaigns and food promotions the amount of money that can be spent on the food budget access to transport. The Australian Guide to Healthy Eating is primarily concerned with physical health. Its purpose is to provide information about the kinds of foods to choose in your diet each day. The word diet is often taken to mean ‘special’ diets or ‘weight-reducing’ diets. This is not what it means here. In this booklet, the word diet means all the things that you usually eat and drink every day. 1 T H E A U S T R A L I A N G U I D E T O H E A LT H Y E A T I N G
The Australian Guide to Healthy Eating - page 6
T HE A USTRALIAN G UIDE TO H EALTHY E ATING The Australian Guide to Healthy Eating has been developed for the Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing and is based on recent research in nutrition. The Guide provides information about the amounts and kinds of food that you need to eat each day to get enough of the nutrients essential for good health and well-being. Healthy eating habits throughout life will also reduce the risk of health problems in later life such as heart disease, cancer, diabetes and obesity. The main food groups in the Australian Guide to Healthy Eating The five food groups are: • bread, cereals, rice, pasta, noodles • vegetables, legumes • fruit • milk, yoghurt, cheese • meat, fish, poultry, eggs, nuts, legumes. These foods provide the important nutrients the body needs. Extra foods The extra foods are other foods that may be eaten sometimes or in small amounts. 2 T H E A U S T R A L I A N G U I D E T O H E A LT H Y E A T I N G
The Australian Guide to Healthy Eating - page 7
To eat a healthy diet: 1. Eat enough food from each of the five food groups every day. 2. Choose different varieties of foods from within each of the five food groups from day to day, week to week and at different times of the year. 3. Eat plenty of plant foods (bread, cereal, rice, pasta, noodles,vegetables, legumes and fruit); moderate amounts of animal foods (milk, yoghurt, cheese, meat, fish, poultry, eggs) in the proportions shown by the Guide; and small amounts of the extra foods, and margarines and oils. 4. Drink plenty of water. 3 T H E A U S T R A L I A N G U I D E T O H E A LT H Y E A T I N G
The Australian Guide to Healthy Eating - page 8
E NJOY A VARIETY OF FOODS EVERYDAY Why is variety so important? Eating a wide variety of foods has a very positive effect on health. Variety among the groups If you eat from each of the five food groups in the amounts recommended, it is likely that your diet will contain all the nutrients that you need. Variety within the groups Within each of the five food groups, different foods provide more of some nutrients than others. If you eat a variety of foods from within each group, it is likely that you will get all the nutrients provided by the foods in that group. For example, in the vegetable group, carrots and pumpkin contain much more vitamin A than do potatoes. Foods also contain substances other than nutrients which may have health benefits. For example, ‘cruciferous’ vegetables such as cauliflower and cabbage are believed to contain protective factors against some cancers. Measures used in this book: 1 cup = 250 mL 1 tablespoon = 20 mL Abbreviations: g = gram mg = milligram mL = millilitre 4 T H E A U S T R A L I A N G U I D E T O H E A LT H Y E A T I N G
The Australian Guide to Healthy Eating - page 9
B READ , C EREALS , R ICE , P ASTA , N OODLES Foods in this group come from grains like wheat, oats, rice, rye, barley, millet and corn. The grains can be eaten whole, ground into flour to make a variety of cereal foods like bread, pasta and noodles, or made into ready-to-eat breakfast cereals. The nutrients provided by the foods in this group include carbohydrates, protein, fibre and a wide range of vitamins and minerals including folate, thiamin, riboflavin, niacin and iron. Wholemeal or wholegrain varieties provide more fibre, vitamins and minerals. Some foods in this group may have fibre, vitamins and minerals added during processing. How much from the Bread, cereals, rice, pasta, noodles group is needed every day? The range for people four years old and over is between 3 and 12 sample serves each day. Use the information on pages 19, 20 and 21 to work out how many sample serves you need. What is a sample serve? A sample serve of bread, cereal, rice, pasta, noodles is: 2 slices of bread 1 medium bread roll 1 cup cooked rice, pasta, noodles 1 cup porridge, 1 1/3 cup breakfast cereal flakes or 1/2 cup muesli. Some practical suggestions: •Eat more wholegrain bread, high fibre cereal, brown rice and wholemeal pasta. •Eat a wide variety of breads including white, brown, wholegrain, mixed grain, rye, and rolls, pita breads and other flat breads. •Instead of choosing most of your serves from this group as bread and breakfast cereal, also eat rice, pasta and noodles, as they contain less salt. •Eat a variety of grains. Try white or brown rice with your meals, add pearl barley to soups. • Try different ready-to-eat breakfast cereals based on a variety of grains like rice, corn, oats and wheat. •Try new cereal foods you may not have eaten before. Try couscous or cooked, grilled polenta in place of pasta or rice. 5 T H E A U S T R A L I A N G U I D E T O H E A LT H Y E A T I N G
The Australian Guide to Healthy Eating - page 10
V EGETABLES , L EGUMES Vegetables come from many different parts of plants, including the leaves, roots, tubers, flowers, stems, seeds and shoots. Some vegetables like tomatoes and pumpkin are the fruit of the plant, but are included in this group because they are used as vegetables. Legumes are the seeds of plants from the Leguminosae family. These vegetables are eaten in the immature form as green peas and beans, and the mature form as dried peas, beans, lentils and chick peas. Vegetables and legumes are a good source of vitamins, minerals, dietary fibre and carbohydrate. Capsicum, broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage and tomatoes are high in vitamin C. Dark green and orange vegetables like spinach, broccoli, carrots and pumpkin are high in vitamin A. Green vegetables, dried peas, beans and lentils are a good source of folate. Most vegetables are good sources of many vitamins. It has been suggested that a diet which includes vegetables rich in vitamins A and C, together with vegetables like broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage and brussels sprouts from the cruciferous family, can help to prevent certain types of cancer. How much from the Vegetables, legumes group is needed every day? The range for people four years old and over is between 2 and 9 sample serves each day. Use the information on pages 19, 20 and 21 to work out how many sample serves you need. What is a sample serve? A sample serve of vegetables, legumes is: 75 g or 1/2 cup cooked vegetables 75g or 1/2 cup cooked dried beans, peas or lentils 1 cup salad vegetables 1 potato. Some practical suggestions: •Eat a variety of vegetables every day. Include: - dark green vegetables like spinach and broccoli - orange vegetables like sweet potato, pumpkin and carrots - cruciferous vegetables like broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, brussels sprouts - starchy vegetables like potatoes, sweet potato, taro and corn - salad vegetables like lettuce, tomato, cucumber and capsicum - legumes like dried peas, beans, lentils and chick peas. 6 T H E A U S T R A L I A N G U I D E T O H E A LT H Y E A T I N G
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