School Curriculum

School Curriculum free pdf ebook was written by on August 17, 2011 consist of 66 page(s). The pdf file is provided by foodday.org and available on pdfpedia since February 17, 2012.

2 | food day lessons these lessons have been developed for food day, 2011, by pamela koch, edd, rd and isobel contento, phd, cdn, teachers college columbia university ...

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School Curriculum pdf




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School Curriculum - page 1
School Curriculum Classroom Lessons to Transform Youth and Their Communities Eat Real These lessons are appropriate for students in upper elementary and middle school grades and can be adapted for younger and older students. Helping Youth
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School Curriculum - page 2
Center for Food & Environment, Program in Nutrition teachers college columbia university These lessons have been developed for Food Day, 2011, by Pamela Koch, EdD, RD and Isobel Contento, PhD, CDN, Teachers College Columbia University, Program in Nutrition and Center for Food & Environment. SEPA Science education PartnerShiP award Supported by the national center for research resources, a part of the national institutes of health The Food Day Lessons are adapted from the Linking Food and the Environment (LiFE) Curriculum Series, developed by the Center for Food & Environment. LiFE was funded by National Institutes of Health (NIH), National Center for Research Resources (NCRR), Science Education Partnership Awards (SEPA) Program, and is published by the National Gardening Association. Inspirational Individuals Additional inspiration for these lessons came from Food: Where Nutrition, Politics & Culture Meet by Deborah Katz and Mary Goodwin (developed out of Food Day in the 1970s), In Defense of Food by Michael Pollan, and the decades of pioneering work by Joan Gussow. Photo Credits: Lesson images: Eat Real, Mostly Plants, Be An Advocate: istock, Not Too Much: 123RF, Naivate the Environment: Center for Food & Enviroment Whole Food Cards: All from 123RF. Food Change Cards: All from 123RF, except Brown Rice which is from istock. Plants We Eat: From Growing Food, Linking Food and the Environment Curriculum Series. Reprinted with permission from Teachers College Columbia University, Center for Food & Environment. Overly Processed Foods Cards: Small Classic Coke Bottle and Peanut Butter Cups: 123RF, Coke Can, 20-ounce bottle and Lay’s Potato Chips: Center for Food & Environment. Food Environment Cards: Farmers’ Market and Supermarket Produce Section: 123RF, Fast Food: Jorge Bach/CSPI, Supermarket Aerial View: original by lyzadanger. Edit by Diliff. 2 | Food Day Lessons
School Curriculum - page 3
Dear Food Day Educator, These lessons are designed to be taught as part of Food Day events in your community, but they can be used at any time. Teaching these lessons, we believe, will be a rewarding experience for you and your students. Your students will be motivated to follow the Food Day Eating Goals of “Eat Real,” “Mostly Plants,” and “Not Too Much.” Your students will learn how to navigate through the food environment to find real food. And, you and your students will work together to become advocates who change the food environment and make it easier for everyone in your community to follow the Food Day Eating Goals. We encourage you to teach these five lessons during the week of October 24, or to make them fit into your curriculum sometime around that time. Imagine the impact we could have if schools across the country taught these lessons at the same time! If you have any questions or comments about these lessons please contact the staff at Food Day’s national office at [email protected] or 202-777-8392. You may also contact the creators of these lessons, Pamela Koch and Isobel Contento from Teachers College Columbia University, at [email protected] or 212-678-3001. Much luck and thanks! The Food Day Team Center for Science in the Public Interest 1220 L St. NW, Suite 300, Washington, DC 20005 Food Day Lessons | 3
School Curriculum - page 4
Table of Contents Overview of the Food Day Lessons. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 How to Use this Guide. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Connecting the Food Day Lessons to the Standards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Lesson 1: Eat Real . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Getting Started . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Core Activity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10 Digging Deeper . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11 Whole Food Photographs cards (teacher resource) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12 Food Change cards (teacher resource) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17 Eat Real Action Plan (student activity sheet) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29 Lesson 2: Mostly Plants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Getting Started . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31 Core Activity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32 Digging Deeper . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33 Plants We Eat cards (teacher resource) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34 MyPlate (student activity sheet) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41 Choose MyPlate (student activity sheet) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42 Lesson 3: Not Too Much . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 Getting Started . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44 Core Activity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45 Digging Deeper . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .46 Fat and Sugar in Food and Drinks experiment sheet (teacher resource) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .47 Play dough recipe (teacher resource) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48 Fat and Sugar cards (teacher resource) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .49 Overly Processed Foods cards (teacher resource) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51 Small-Size-It Action Plan (student activity sheet) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .52 Lesson 4: Navigate the Environment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Getting Started . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .54 Core Activity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55 Digging Deeper . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .56 Food Environment (cards) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .57 Seeking Out Real Food Action Plan (student activity sheet) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59 Lesson 5: Become An Advocate. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 Getting Started . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .61 Core Activity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .62 Digging Deeper . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .63 Advocacy Project Ideas (teacher resource) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .64 Food Environment Advocacy Project (student activity sheet) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .65 Pledging to the Food Day Eating Goals (student activity sheet) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .66 4 | Food Day Lessons
School Curriculum - page 5
Overview of the Food Day Lessons Lesson 1: Eat Real Eating real food is eating whole foods that come straight from plants or animals. These foods are filled with the nutrients that our bodies need to do our best at everything we want to do and help us stay healthy long into the future. Foods that are processed, especially those that are overly processed, are stripped of nutrients. Additionally the processing, packaging, transporting, and marketing of food uses excessive energy and is harmful to the natural environment. At the end of this lesson, students create an action plan to be on their way to eating real. Lesson 2: Mostly Plants When we eat plants, we get not only essential vitamins, minerals, protein, and dietary fiber, but also thousands of phytonutrients that may help our bodies be their healthiest now and protect us from diseases later. We eat all different parts of plants: roots, stems, leaves, flowers, fruits, and seeds. Animal foods are important too, as sources of protein, vitamins and minerals, but they are also often high in saturated fat and cholesterol so we should eat small portions. Students learn to use MyPlate so they can make sure at least three-quarters of their meals are plants. Lesson 3: Not Too Much In addition to the goals of “Eat Real” and “Mostly Plants,” today’s food environment demands that we also make a conscious effort not to eat too much, especially of overly processed foods with little or no nutrients and high amounts of added fat, sugar, and salt. Indeed, many of the typical portions of sweetened beverages and snack foods contain a day’s worth of fat and/or sugar. When we are aware of this, we can make a conscious effort to have whole foods instead of overly processed foods and to small-size-it when we do have overly processed foods. Lesson 4: Navigate the Environment The food environment is everything including corner stores, advertisements on television, gardens in our neighborhoods, fast food places that dot the countryside, to fruit stands. The food environment strongly influences what we eat, despite our best efforts to make healthful choices. When we become aware of choices that meet the Food Day Eating Goals of “Eat Real,” “Mostly Plants,” and “Not Too Much”, we can seek these options out and navigate our way to better health as a first step to having today’s children live long, healthful, and productive lives. Lesson 5: Be An Advocate The best way to get us all following the Food Day Eating Goals is to create an environment where real, plant-based foods are the norm and easy to find. We can do this by having more farmers’ markets, fruit stands, gardens, farms, and restaurants that serve whole, locally sourced foods, and families cooking and eating together. Additionally, we want to create an environment where overly processed foods come in small sizes and are not so prevalent. In this lesson, classes create a project to become advocates who change the food environment in their community. Food Day Lessons | 5
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How to Use This Guide Lesson Plans Getting started Each lesson begins with a Getting Started page. On this page there is a detailed Overview of the lesson. The Behavior Change Objective is the specific food behavior we want the students to change as a result of the lesson. The Learning Objectives are brief, clear statements of what the students will be able to perform by the end of the lesson in order to achieve the Behavior Change Objective. Finally, the Background for Teachers provides the background context for why the lesson is important. This section is designed to motivate you and get you excited to teach the lessons. Also, sometimes this section might be a bit shocking and get you angry enough to want to change the system and forge the way to our country eating real. Core Activities This page contains the Aim, which is a one-sentence overview of the main point of the lesson. You can share the aim with your students as appropriate. All the Materials needed for the lesson are listed. Any materials that are in bold-italic are provided in this guide. Before You Begin details what you will need to do before you teach this lesson to your class. The Procedure provides step-by-step instructions for teaching the lesson. The blue text after each procedure number gives you the big idea and the text below provides the details. Be creative and enhance the lessons to make them work for your class. Digging Deeper This lesson will give you enough to whet your appetite and get you ready for more exploration, discus- sion and activities about “Eat Real,” “Mostly Plants,” “Not Too Much,” “Navigate the Environment,” and “Become An Advocate.” Use the Activities and Resources to Extend This Lesson to be inspired by what others have done and to get resources and ideas for additional activities and projects. Lesson Resources Cards, Experiment Sheets and other Resources for Teachers As appropriate, the lessons have cards, experiment sheets, and other resources that will help maximize your ability to effectively teach these lessons. Activity Sheets for Students Every lesson contains activity sheets, enabling students to create an action plan that will help them meet the Behavior Change Objective. 6 | Food Day Lessons
School Curriculum - page 7
Connecting the Food Day Lessons to the Common Core State Standards As you are probably aware, our nation now has the Common Core State Standards for literacy and mathematics: The Common Core State Standards ...are designed to be robust and relevant to the real world, reflecting the knowledge and skills that our young people need for success in college and careers. With American students fully prepared for the future, our communities will be best positioned to compete successfully in the global economy. The Food Day lessons embrace the idea of preparing young people to be ready for the real world. And, part of the world they are inheriting is a world with a food system that is threatening both our personal health and the health of the natural environment. We hope these lessons inspire you to use food and our current food system as a topic throughout your curriculum. The Food Day lessons can specifically help you meet the below standards in English Language Arts & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects: College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Reading Integration of Knowledge and Ideas Standard 7: Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse media and formats, including visually and quantitatively, as well as in words. Use the visuals and experiments you are presenting in Lesson 1–3 as a way for students to evaluate content, and find ways to incorporate these experiences into what the students are reading and writing . Standard 8: Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, including the validity of the reasoning as well as the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence. Have these students analyze what they are learning so they can articulate the quality of the evidence . You may also have the students find different sources of information about food and compare and contrast the evidence from these various sources . College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Writing Research to Build and Present Knowledge Standard 7: Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects based on focused questions, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation. The projects the students create in Lesson 5 are perfectly suited to be a sustained project . Be sure the students develop clear, measurable questions for their projects and conduct observations and collect data to understand the nature and impact of the projects . Standard 8: Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources, assess the credibility and accuracy of each source, and integrate the information while avoiding plagiarism. Use the Food Day lessons as a starting point and have students gather information on any of the Food Day lesson topics . They can assess the credibility of each source and create their own writings or projects to teach others what they learned . Connecting the Food Day Lessons to Science Education Standards These lessons also touch upon some of the Benchmarks for Science Literacy by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), Project 2061, specifically in the areas of “designed world,” and “living environment.” These lessons also touch on the National Science Education Standards (National Research Council) in the areas of “science in personal and social perspectives,” “science as inquiry,” and “science and technology.” Food Day Lessons | 7
School Curriculum - page 8
Lesson 1: Eat Real 8 | Food Day Lessons
School Curriculum - page 9
Lesson 1: Eat Real — Getting Started — Overview In this lesson, students learn why eating real, that is eating whole foods from plants and animals — fruits, vegetables, whole grains, legumes, lean meats, poultry, fish and low fat diary products — is so important. They are packed with the nutrients our bodies need. They keep us going today, and help us stay healthy long into the future. Food tastings with fresh, locally produced fruits and vegetables are recommended for students to experience wholesome eating. Students then contrast whole foods with overly processed foods, such as sweetened beverages, chips, and candy. These foods lack essential nutrients and are loaded with fat, salt, and sugar. The lesson ends with students making an Eat Real Action Plan to replace overly processed foods with whole foods. Possible action plans are: replace a bag of chips with a piece of fruit; replace soda with an ice cold glass of tap water adorned with lemon, orange, or cucumber slices; have a salad with lunch and skip the popsicle. Background for Teachers The foods we enjoy should promote, not undermine, our good health. Several hundred thousand Ameri- cans die prematurely every year due to what we eat, with medical costs running well over $100 billion. A healthy diet, especially one that follows the goals of “Eat Real,” “Mostly Plants,” and “Not Too Much” as is promoted in these lessons, can lower blood pressure, cholesterol levels, blood sugar, and prevent everything from tooth decay and obesity to heart disease, stroke, diabetes, and cancer. By teaching these lessons, you are playing a role in helping your students reach their fullest potential now, as well as maintaining their health in the future. Although many nutrition lessons consist of students learning about food groups and how to sort foods into these group, this typically does not translate into healthful eating behaviors. The Food Day curriculum takes the stance that to effectively change what students eat, we need to focus on specific, clear behaviors. During the activities in the Food Day lessons, students will become motivated to follow the Food Day Eating Goals and learn practical skills for making positive changes to their diet. This lesson is about eating real. That means eating more whole foods — foods that come right from plants and animals. Students see beautiful, enticing photographs of real foods so they know what eating real means and feel good about eating real. They then see how foods can be changed or processed into other things. Sometimes some processing is useful, such as grinding wheat berries to make whole-wheat flour — but far too many of the foods available around us are overly processed and are dramatically changed to something unrecognizable from their plant and/or animal origins. Over-processing removes nutrients and adds excessive sugar, fat, and salt. In all the Food Day lessons, students take what they learn out of the classroom door by creating action plans. Actively making changes now can help them build positive habits for the future. In this lesson, the action plan is to eat a whole food instead of an overly processed food, getting them on the path to “Eat Real.” 9 Behavior Change Objective As a result of this lesson, students will eat more whole foods from plants and animals and fewer overly processed foods. Learning Objectives Students will be able to: • explain what it means to “Eat Real;” • describe the health and ecological benefits of eating more whole foods and fewer overly processed foods; • list foods that are whole, foods that are minimally processed (changed a little), and foods that are overly processed (changed a lot); • create a personal action plan to eat a whole food instead of a processed food. Food Day Lessons |
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Lesson 1: Eat Real — Core Activity — Procedure 1. Introduce Eating Real Bring to the students’ attention the Whole Food Photographs cards (and whole foods if you have them) displayed around the classroom. Ask the students to look at the photographs, to think about what these foods have in common with each other, and to share any thoughts they have about the photographs (and foods). Accept all answers. Explain that these are what are called “whole foods” — they are in their original forms, the way they come from plants and animals. This lesson is called “Eat Real” and when we eat real, we are eating foods that are right from nature, or close to how they come from nature. Ask the students what types of foods are missing from the photographs (they might mention foods such as chips, candy, and soda). Explain that some foods are processed foods. Although processed foods start out with ingredients from plants and animals, they are changed, sometimes a little and sometimes a lot, from how nature made them. If you brought in whole foods, have a food tasting with them during the lesson. Aim To gain an appreciation for why to eat more whole foods and fewer processed foods and create a specific action plan for positive change. 2. Discuss Why-to Eat Real Explain that when we eat whole foods we get all the nutrients that come from nature as nature intended. Eating whole foods helps us be our best at everything we do today and keeps us healthy long into the future. When we “Eat Real”, we are taking care of our bodies and maintaining our health. Eating real is also good for the earth. Foods that are whole, or close to whole, use less energy because they are not extensively processed and often have no or minimal packaging. Materials • Whole Food Photographs cards • (optional) whole foods • Food Change cards • Eat Real Action Plan activity sheet 3. Contrast Whole and Processed Foods Take out the Food Change cards. These cards take five whole foods and show what happens to them when they are processed. Hang up the five cards marked as “whole.” Ask them to look at the “how healthy” bars (green) and the “how much processing” bars (red). Have them note that the green bars are all high and the red bars are all low. Use page 18 to guide the discussion on these foods with students: we explain why whole foods are good for us and for the earth. Add the foods labeled “changed a little.” Place these cards next to the cards with the same base food (for example put the orange juice next to the orange). Ask the students to share how these foods have changed, such as the corn was removed from the cob and put in the can, the chicken was fried in oil, and the yogurt had cultures added. Have the students look at the “how nutritious” and “how much processing” bars. The nutrient bars went down because some of the nutrients have been removed and fat, salt and/or sugar was added. The red bars consequently went up. Use page 19 to guide the discussion on why processing foods makes them less healthy for us and for the earth. Add the foods labeled “changed a lot.” The students may recognize these foods (and like these foods). Explain that, highly — or overly — processed foods are often also heavily marketed and typically have large quantities of added sugar, fat, and salt. Although these overly processed foods are designed to taste good, they are not good for long-term health and the energy used to create these foods is not good for the environment. Use page 20 to guide the discussion on why overly processed foods are not good for us or for the earth. Before You Begin • Print and display the Whole Food Photographs cards. If you brought in whole foods display them as well. • Print the Food Change Cards and be sure you have enough space on the board to hang the 15 cards. There are 5 foods (orange, corn, chicken, rice, milk) and 3 versions of each food (whole, minimally processed, highly processed). • Print and make copies of the Eat Real Action Plan activity sheet for each student. 4. Create Eat Real Action Plans Hand out the Eat Real Action Plan activity sheets. In the Food Day lessons, students not only learn why healthful eating is so important, they also make action plans that help them build their confidence and ability to make choices that are good for them and good for the earth. They start with making an action plan to replace an overly processed food with a whole food instead. As the students work through this sheet, make sure their action plan is specific and clear so they will know if they are successful at achieving their plan. Have several students share their plans. Help students make these plans specific, if they are not. Food Day Lessons 10 |
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